Seizure Disorders
SEIZURES

Seizures (convulsions, fits, epileptic attacks) are occasionally encountered in our household pets and can be frightening. They can occur in cats and dogs of all ages and can be due to a variety of different causes.

INTERNAL DISORDERS THAT SECONDARILY
 AFFECT THE BRAIN FUNCTION

Poisons
Kidney disease
Liver disorders
Heart disease
Low blood sugar

ACTUAL BRAIN DISORDERS

Epilepsy
Brain Infections
Degenerative conditions
Birth defects (“water on the brain”, etc.)
Brain tumors

As you can see a seizure is not a diagnosis in itself, but rather an indicator of an underlying problem. After one such attack it is often difficult to tell if your pet will ever have another "fit".  Some pets do have one seizure only and never have another one !

AFTER A SINGULAR SEIZURE we will recommend:

1.

A complete History......

to gain as much information as possible from you that might "shed some light" as to the cause of your pet's seizures.

2.

A thorough Physical Examination

to help your pet "tell" us if there is any obvious disorder that could contribute to the problem.

3.

A comprehensive Blood Test

to reveal any internal organ disorders that are not apparent on the physical examination.

If no underlying problems are detected and the possibility exists that your pet may never have another seizure then we may not prescribe medication.

IF THE SEIZURES ARE REPETITIVE OR YOU OR THE DOCTOR FEEL THAT THEY MAY RECUR
we may recommend:

1.

Further Blood Tests

to evaluate liver function, etc.

2.

EEG (brain wave)

if brain infection is a possibility

3.

MRI Scan (brain scan)

if a brain tumor is a consideration as the cause of the fits

4.

Spinal Tap

reveals whether meningitis is a concern

5.

EKG   

reveals abnormal heartbeats that could cause seizures

Even if all tests are normal (negative results are very helpful to the doctor) medication will likely be prescribed in an attempt to prevent or reduce the severity of future seizures. Periodic examinations and sometimes changes in therapy may be needed.  70% of all epileptics are well controlled on medication.

 

Web site designed by Ed Acton for Tri-City Pet Hospital